“The Way of the Eagle” an Inspirational Holiday Gift!

As the holidays approach, a little reminder that The Way of the Eagle: an Early California Journey of Awakening will make a great inspirational gift for the holiday season.  Two readers expressed this so well:

       “This is a wonderful story that thoroughly entertains while teaching spiritual values and some history of an important culture in our world.  I couldn’t help thinking while reading this story that it should be in every school library; it’s relevant for adults but how important for our children growing up today with similar moral issues, and what an aesthetic way to help them as they struggle to find themselves and their own truths rather than just going along with the crowd.  The artwork and story are in beautiful harmony. Thank you so much, author and artist!”  –Mo Biairdi

       “The Way of the Eagle tells the tale of a Native American boy learning who he is.  D.E. Lamont weaves a beautiful tapestry filled with details of native life in southern California at a time before European conquest. Her writing blends the exacting detail of daily Native American life with an exquisite spiritual quest that makes it easy to experience the beauty and power of a culture all but lost in the modern world.  Reading this tale was a pleasure, and I highly recommend it as entertaining and enlightening fare. Be prepared to soar like an eagle.  –Jack Thompson

You may order via this website, or at Amazon.com and Barnes and Noble. 

Welcome to The Way of the Eagle Journal!

Welcome to the first article of my Journal. Or, as the Tongva, the First People of Los Angeles, say in greeting, Nachochan!  That means literally “My eyes see your eyes, my hands are open.”

I’ve updated and reposted this article in celebration of having just published my novelette, The Way of the Eagle: An Early California Journey of Awakening. It’s now available on my website, at Amazon.com in both print and Kindle, and very soon will be in many mobile e-stores like Apple, Sony, and more. This Journal blog is also visible now on my pages at the Goodreads and Smashwords websites. 




First, to clarify, I am not of Native American descent. I had grandparents on one side who were Spanish/Mexican from Los Angeles, and on the other Russian/East European from New York. My website page, About the Author, describes how I first became interested in the Native American Indian culture as a child. 

Over the last couple of months, I’ve begun writing about subjects here relating to the book that are of great interest to me and, I hope, will be to you as well. A few of these include Native American spirituality, culture, and building bridges of understanding between Native and non-Native individuals. I’d welcome comments on these subjects from readers.

One special interest of mine is in showing how people have innate common spiritual qualities and abilities, no matter their specific background, religious or philosophical beliefs. These qualities are sacred in several senses of the word. What I mean is that, if anything about humanity is sacred and valuable, it is our inborn or native qualities and abilities, which I believe have their source in our spiritual nature.  They are then expressed through our human identity. Lots of these qualities are everyday things most people might not even describe as spiritual.  

One of my reasons for writing my book, The Way of the Eaglehas been to make Native American viewpoints and beliefs better known to non-Natives. Understanding is the basis of all progress and improved relations between people of good will. I hope to bring alive one narrow slice of the original Southern Californian Tongvan way of life and make it easier to imagine and understand what they may have thought, felt, understood, and experienced…and the spiritual knowledge and abilities they may have possessed. 

Fortunately the current American and European cultures have largely moved beyond automatically considering all native cultures “primitive,” as was almost universal in the 19th century and before. The amazing and profound speeches and statements of great Native American chiefs, leaders and orators show, in contrast, how enlightened and advanced their thought and beliefs were.

Therefore, in this website, I will find excerpts of great American Indian orators of the past and present that are legally OK to quote, so that others can begin to understand the beautiful way of life, thought and expression that preceded our own here in America. There is a huge amount we can learn from them, admire, and add to our own lives to make them better.

I’d love to hear from you via the comments box on my website Journal page, or my website Guestbook.  Please check back often to catch future Journal entries (or subscribe to receive the Journal via email by filling in the “Subscribe” window).   

My best until next time!
D.E. Lamont

Spirituality – the Essence of Mystery or Something We Can Know and Experience?

I’d like to begin to tackle what may be considered an almost unimaginably wide subject, and one which is rife with countless different opinions.  The subject is spirituality (in the broad sense, not just as a reference to one religion).  Spirituality, the Great Mystery to so many for so very long.

First of all, I’m not going to pretend that this question can be answered in one short article!  I’m also not going to say that it can be answered to everyone’s satisfaction, or at all, for some people – I don’t think it can.  But I think we can get closer to some pieces of the truth than you might think for such an awe-inspiring and sweeping subject.  While I am not an academician or theologian or other classically educated creature, I do know something about this subject.  If I’m not exactly a “street” philosopher, I could be considered a “desktop” philosopher.  I’ve learned a lot over the years but I do not, repeat, do NOT write as any kind of scholar or ivory tower expert.

The reason I’m interested in writing about spirituality is because in my own experience, the subject is fascinating, contains much food for thought and is outright enlightening.  I’m not very much interested in theory.  I’m mainly interested in helping people discover more about themselves, open their minds to another view if they have never considered these ideas before, and perhaps inspire them to do more investigation themselves.  

This article is also based on one of my very firm beliefs: that spirituality NEED NOT and SHOULD NOT BE MADE into an esoteric, difficult subject to understand.  The knowledge IS “out there” and the great mystery can be dissected into small bits of simple  knowledge.  Stay tuned for my next article in this series!

Gentling Wild Mustangs – Unique Spiritual Help for Native American Youth


Incredible!  I just learned about a unique Mustang Gentling program sponsored by Red Horse Nation, a 501(c)(3) horse program of Lifesavers, Inc., a mustang rescue ranch located in Lancaster, California.  

Native American youth, many from urban areas, have the opportunity to go to the desert, to a Mustang ranch, and learn how to gentle and interact safely with wild mustangs.  Not only do they get in touch with a vital part of their heritage, the horse culture, they learn to take responsibility for and have a relationship with these beautiful wild animals in this 6-week program.

You can read more about this program and the experience of one youth in his own words in an interesting article by Suzi West in the “Spirit of the West” column, here: 

Spirit of the West Article on Wild Mustang Gentling Program

Red Horse Nation also posts on their home page the principles it was founded upon.  I was delighted to see there a listing of “Native American Principles” – a profound list of precepts to follow, in the Native American way, to live a happier and more fulfilled life of balance between the body, mind and spirit.  This list will have the most relevance to Native Americans, but any person can benefit from reading and following these principles, as well as come to better understand the American Indian way.  Here is the link to the website of Red Horse Nation:

Red Horse Nation website